Indecisiveness

Judges 19:11-21

11When they were near Jebus and the day was almost gone, the servant said to his master, “Come, let’s stop at this city of the Jebusites and spend the night.” 12His master replied, “No. We won’t go into any city whose people are not Israelites. We will go on to Gibeah.” 13He added, “Come, let’s try to reach Gibeah or Ramah and spend the night in one of those places.” 14So they went on, and the sun set as they neared Gibeah in Benjamin. 15There they stopped to spend the night. They went and sat in the city square, but no one took them in for the night.

16That evening an old man from the hill country of Ephraim, who was living in Gibeah (the inhabitants of the place were Benjamites), came in from his work in the fields. 17When he looked and saw the traveler in the city square, the old man asked, “Where are you going? Where did you come from?”

18He answered, “We are on our way from Bethlehem in Judah to a remote area in the hill country of Ephraim where I live. I have been to Bethlehem in Judah and now I am going to the house of the Lord. No one has taken me in for the night. 19We have both straw and fodder for our donkeys and bread and wine for ourselves your servants—me, the woman and the young man with us. We don’t need anything.” 20“You are welcome at my house,” the old man said. “Let me supply whatever you need. Only don’t spend the night in the square.” 21So he took him into his house and fed his donkeys. After they had washed their feet, they had something to eat and drink.

Introduction

To trust in Christ is to depend upon Him in everything. Yes! Everything in our life—thoughts and decision, we practically rely upon Him. In what practical way we depend upon the Lord? How do we let Christ performs his lordship in us? How can we know that we are dependent in Him and not in ourselves?

When we seek the Lord to reign in us and be the Master of our life, when we seek his righteousness to be our guide in decisions, by faith, we expect the Lord to give us the right decision and action and His right timing.

When I was applying as pastor in this church, the Board of Trustees told me to send video sermon. Actually, the church where I preached in the video I sent, I also applied as pastor. The first time I preached there, the video did not come out as expected. But the church requested me to preach again the following Sunday. We took a video and sent here.

I prayed that God would open just one door for me to know which church He wanted me to be. My family did not know anything of my application here. They were surprised when I told them that the B.O.T. wanted to see us online.

Truly, it is not easy to decide when there are many options. God is God of order not confusion. It’s necessary to allow Christ’s Spirit prevails in us (for us) to know His will. By faith, when we are dependent in Christ, He gives us patience to wait for His right timing. When we rely in ourselves, there’s indecisiveness.

The indecisiveness of the Levite was tested when his servant suggested where to spend the night. When the Levite said, “Let’s try to reach Gibeah or Ramah” it implied that he was not sure which place to stop. So, whichever city they reached when it gets dark that was the place he selected.

1. Select

11When they were near Jebus and the day was almost gone, the servant said to his master, “Come, let’s stop at this city of the Jebusites and spend the night.” 12His master replied, “No. We won’t go into any city whose people are not Israelites. We will go on to Gibeah.” 13He added, “Come, let’s try to reach Gibeah or Ramah and spend the night in one of those places.” 14So they went on, and the sun set as they neared Gibeah in Benjamin. 15There they stopped to spend the night. They went and sat in the city square, but no one took them in for the night.

When the Levite told his servant that they would not go into any city whose people are not Israelites, did he trust in the Lord or trust in his people?

Perhaps, the Levite selected to stop in a city where Israelite lived in the hope that he (as a Levite) will be treated better than in a non-Israelite city. Did he trust that whichever city they stop was God’s will? Did he test if the Lord favored him when he decided to stop whichever city they reached at sunset?

Most of the time, we practice our faith in Christ very similar to how the Levite did. We are often misled to believe that if we do whatever we think best for us and trust that God would do the rest is biblical. Such mindset is the best we can do as humans. But does it show dependence upon Christ or dependence on chances? Circumstances are God’s will but where does faith fall in chances?

 Jacob’s Wives

When Jacob married Leah and Rachel, was it God’s will? Was it God’s will for Jacob to have two wives and had children with the two servants?

Jacob believed that God will be with him, watch over him, and provide for his needs until he returned to Canaan. Jacob desired to marry Rachel but circumstances allowed him to marry Leah. It’s because his father-in-law Laban deceived him. Why did God allow such deception? Was it because Jacob had relied upon his human attraction to choose Rachel as his wife?

It was God’s will for Jacob to marry Leah despite of deception because God has designed that Leah’s son Judah would be the ancestry lineage of Jesus. It was not Jacob’s decision to marry two women or had children with four women. God allowed cultural practices to accomplish His purposes in the life of Jacob.

Jacob didn’t rely upon chances. In spite of unexpected circumstances, Jacob trusted that God would accomplish His purposes in his life through those circumstances he faced. How? Jacob did not reject Leah. He accepted her as his wife. Although, his love for Rachel was greater, he welcomed Leah as his wife.

Like Jacob, we often follow the inclination of our heart desires. We also don’t pay much attention to circumstance God presents us if they are lesser attractive to our taste or cultural preferences. Nonetheless, God would still supply our need even when we fail to discern His will.

2. Supply

16That evening an old man from the hill country of Ephraim, who was living in Gibeah (the inhabitants of the place were Benjamites), came in from his work in the fields. 17When he looked and saw the traveler in the city square, the old man asked, “Where are you going? Where did you come from?”

18He answered, “We are on our way from Bethlehem in Judah to a remote area in the hill country of Ephraim where I live. I have been to Bethlehem in Judah and now I am going to the house of the Lord. No one has taken me in for the night. 19We have both straw and fodder for our donkeys and bread and wine for ourselves your servants—me, the woman and the young man with us. We don’t need anything.”

The Levite had sufficiency. He was not very sure where they will stop, so he had considered what they needed in their journey. Most of us have similar mindset with the Levite.  We are not very sure where God leads us, but we want to be sure that we have enough supply. We cannot rely upon living one day at a time so that the Lord’s model prayer is argued to be literal.

How do you interpret Matthew 6:11? 11Give us today our daily bread.”

Did the Lord want us to ask for what we need for the day or what we need for the rest of our life? In day-to-day trust in Lord for daily need, He wants us to come to Him often. We pray for daily needs, and not a lifetime supply.

Asking God for lifetime supply instead of daily needs implies worry of the future. Such is trust in the provision not in the provider. Take note: Christ said in Matthew 6:33-34, 33Seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. 34Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Do you trust that the Lord supply the things we don’t ask if we trust Him to be with us, watch over us, and provide for our needs? Trust in Christ becomes more apparent when we are in need but less trust when we are sufficient.

20“You are welcome at my house,” the old man said. “Let me supply whatever you need. Only don’t spend the night in the square.” 21So he took him into his house and fed his donkeys. After they had washed their feet, they had something to eat and drink.

The Levite trusted in his identity as Levite to help them find a place to stay but nobody paid much attention to them. They went to the city square in the hope that people might notice them, but no one was concerned about them. But an old man appeared and offered to supply what they needed. Why an old man?

It pictures the spirituality of the people in that city had deteriorated. An old man is often interpreted as one who deserves respect in contrast to uncaring and unsympathetic attitude of the residents in that city. He was generous. He invited the Levite, his servant and concubine and offered to supply their needs.

Most often, believers miss the career opportunity that God has prepared because of the desire to have more, instead of what’s sufficient. It’s hard to pray for daily bread because it takes faith to trust God for just daily provision. We don’t want to be victims when there’s shutdown in the company. We want to save as much as we can for the rainy day so to speak. Do you pray like King Solomon?

He prayed in Proverbs 30:8-9, 8Keep falsehood and lies far from me; give me neither poverty nor riches, but give me only my daily bread. 9Otherwise, I may have too much and disown you and say, ‘Who is the Lord?’ Or I may become poor and steal, and so dishonor the name of my God.

And God generously gave Solomon more than daily bread.

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